Can I Get a Witness?

How beautiful it is to see that young people are “street preachers” (callejeros de la fe), joyfully bringing Jesus to every street, every town square and every corner of the earth!  Evangelii Gaudium The Joy of the Gospel 106

Years back, I offered this post below as a set of suggestions or guidelines in preparing young people to offer a witness talk.  You will find it below with revisions for readability.

As of this writing, I await delivery of my copy of Saying Is Believing: The Necessity of Testimony in Adolescent Spiritual Development. Will the below thoughts be confirmed or confronted? Watch for reporting on this in a future post.

–  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –

The cry resounds throughout the heritage of our African-American Church, “Can I Get a Witness?” The expectations of such a question is high. It searches for the Spirit. It anticipates that the Spirit is present within what is discussed or taught. It hopes that the  same Spirit can be found within two or more of the gathering of believers. “Can I Get a Witness?”  A God-intervention is possible, expected.

PopeFrancisAndPeopleABCAs a Church we have Creed and beliefs.  These come not just because of scripture and tradition. These come not just because of our respect for the teacher (pastor, catechists, parent, youth minister). Creed and belief occur because of our lived experiences of ourselves. Creed and belief occur because of those around us willing to profess their lived faith.

This article was first drafted as Pope Benedict XVI declared a Year of Faith (in his apostolic letter Porta Fideis). It began October 11, 2012. It commemorated the fiftieth anniversary of the opening of the Second Vatican Council. It further celebrated the twentieth anniversary of the publication of the Catechism of the Catholic Church. The Year concluded on the Solemnity of Christ the King, November 24, 2013. Pope Benedict stated his goal in declaring a Year of Faith to:

iarouse in every believer the aspiration to profess the faith in fullness and with renewed conviction, with confidence and hope (PF9)

In Evangelii Nuntiando, Pope Paul VI reminded us that the first means of evangelization is the witness of an authentically Christian life, given over to God in a communion that nothing should destroy and at the same time given to one’s neighbor with limitless zeal… ‘Modern man listens more willingly to witnesses than to teachers, and if he does listen to teachers, it is because they are witnesses.’ (EN 41) Being a witness to the faith (in both words and deeds) is not an option if we are passing on the faith.

Pope Benedict reminds us that

It is the love of Christ that fills our hearts and impels us to evangelize. Today as in the past, he sends us through the highways of the world to proclaim his Gospel to all the peoples of the earth (PF7)

as well as that

The renewal of the Church is also achieved through the witness offered by the lives of believers: by their very existence in the world, Christians are called to radiate the word of truth that the Lord Jesus has left us. (PF 5)

Clearly, one specific way that we in youth ministry will challenge young people and those that serve with them to evangelize as well as radiate the truth will be through the personal testimony of a Witness Talk.

What makes for an effective witness talk?

A Witness Talk Is Not About Me.

Everyone has a story of an experience of faith. A witness talk is effective when it invites recipients to make connections from the story offered to their own experience.

Yes, it is your story. Yes, you  play a central role in the narrative of the story. These are your experiences being share. These are your feelings. The transformation of this story changed YOUR life. The public telling of a witness talk changes all that. It expands the story beyond you, beyond your own experience, and becomes something much more significant.

Confessing with the lips indicates in turn that faith implies public testimony and commitment. A Christian may never think of belief as a private act. Faith is choosing to stand with the Lord so as to live with him. This “standing with him” points towards an understanding of the reasons for believing. (PF10)

A witness talk is not meant to be imposed or thrust upon others, but given and shared freely within a community of friends. It is not intended to a moment of preaching as much as it is mean to be about reaching.

Further, care is necessary in developing the content of the presentation. If the faith story conveyed remains only about tragedy, suffering, or scandalous behavior; then we are confining faith to Good Friday experiences. We are an Easter people, and Alleluia is our song. A full and rich witness story values discussing the transformation that comes when we stand with God in our lives. Our faith stories are neither limited to confessing our weakness nor heralding our strengths. Our stories must call attention to the faithfulness of God amidst it all.

When a witness talk speaks only about themself  it comes off as superficial and evasive. When one speaks from the heart, others will take notice. Your experiences might make it easier for others to share their own. A reciever might detect inconsistencies in the actions, behavior, attitude of a witness talker around their personal testimony. When this occurs, it draw attention away from the subject and towards the speaker.

A Witness Talk Is About The…

…Context of the Presentation

The context of where and when a witness talk is presented must be considered when developing an effective witness talk. What will precede the presentation? What will be the activity immediately following the presentation?

It is natural for recipients of any presentation to attempt to “connect the dots” between programmatic elements. Those who are preparing witness talks should have a clear understanding as to where their own story fits into the larger story being shared.

… Reception of the Audience

Especially with teen audiences, but true for all audience, there should be great care taken of the audience members in the preparation of a story. Witness Stories can often be quite dramatic with emphasis on the harsh realities of life. Yet, the trauma retold within a witness talk can potentially be connected to quite similar traumas within the lives of the listener.

Great care should be taken in screening such witness talks with serious consideration for the listener. In some cases, such a talk might be appropriate, but there should be care and consideration as to how a listener might respond. Those responsible for the context of the whole program may need to respond to a potential audience response.

In previous times and generation, the success of a witness talk may have been wrongly evaluated by how many tears and sniffles fill the room. To intentionally seek such a response is not as much about being a witness of faith as it is about being a manipulator of emotions. This perpetuates an unsafe environment where one might explore their own relationship with God.

Faith grows when it is lived as an experience of love received and when it is communicated as an experience of grace and joy. (PF7)

A Witness Talk Is About Thee

In the National Directory for Catechesis, criteria has been set for an authentic presentation of the Christian Message. It reminds us that “The Word of God contained in Sacred Scripture and Sacred Tradition is the single source of the fundamental criteria for the presentation of the Christian message.” The presentation of the Christian message, which should always be at the core of witness talk, therefore

> Centers on Jesus Christ
> Introduces the Trinitarian dimensions of the Gospel message
> Proclaims the Good News of salvation and liberation
> Comes from and leads to the Church
> Communicates the profound dignity of the human person

The above list, while not inclusive of all the elements identified in the NDC, does demand that an authentic presentation / witness talk makes clear and direct connections back to Jesus and the Gospels as well as within the rich tradition of our Church.

These are times when researchers suggest that the underlying message of faith transmitted to young people is a Moralistic Therapeutic Deism that treats God as some sort of “Cosmic Butler.” Witness talk must speak to the challenges and joys of discipleship with Jesus, and not some sort of God who “had my back” when called upon.

We will need to keep our gaze fixed upon Jesus Christ, the “pioneer and perfecter of our faith” (Heb 12:2): in him, all the anguish and all the longing of the human heart finds fulfillment. The joy of love, the answer to the drama of suffering and pain, the power of forgiveness in the face of an offence received and the victory of life over the emptiness of death: all this finds fulfillment in the mystery of his Incarnation, in his becoming man, in his sharing our human weakness so as to transform it by the power of his resurrection. In him who died and rose again for our salvation, the examples of faith that have marked these two thousand years of our salvation history are brought into the fullness of light. (PF13)

Finally, a recipient of a witness talk should never walk away with the impression of how weak the presenter was (or the emotional prompt that the recipient likely shares in same weakness.) We all must remain mindful of how powerful God is within the lives of God’s people. St. Paul serves as a model here when he confesses to his own struggles. We see him admitting to his imperfections in Romans 7 “For I do not do the good I want, but I do the evil I do not want.” In 2 Corinthians 12:7  Paul describes his condition as “a thorn in the flesh was given to me.” Without outlining specifics, he acknowledges his own sinfulness. In faith, though, St. Paul continues by detailing that God’s grace is enough and that power is made perfect in weakness.

A witness talk becomes about Thee, our Lord, when the audience recipients and the presenter find themselves in solidarity with one another. Yes, we are different. Yes, we have some unique but some common struggles. Yet, the Lord is there for each of us- front pew sitter, late back row arriver, someone who just walked in or came along with a friend, and the speaker- We are each created uniquely, but the Creator’s love for each of remains equal and constant.

Preach the Gospel At All Times

Sometimes it is necessary to use words. But, we should take great care with our words. A witness talk provided by a peer or a trusted adult might well become the “door of faith” (Acts 14:27) opening for another.  By our witness, they are ushered into the life of communion with God and offering entry into his Church.

Many people, while not claiming to have the gift of faith, are nevertheless sincerely searching for the ultimate meaning and definitive truth of their lives and of the world. This search is an authentic “preamble” to the faith, because it guides people onto the path that leads to the mystery of God. (PF10)

When we offer a witness talk, we find ourselves joined

By faith, across the centuries, (with) men and women of all ages, whose names are written in the Book of Life (cf. Rev 7:9, 13:8), (who) have confessed the beauty of following the Lord Jesus wherever they were called to bear witness to the fact that they were Christian: in the family, in the workplace, in public life, in the exercise of the charisms and ministries to which they were called. (PF13)

This same communion of saints did not always find the mission of sharing faith to be easy. They each responded to the call of “Can I Get a Witness?” in both word and in deed. Remember that there is quite often less personal gain in sharing faith. There is always a sacrificial possibility of risk or pain in witnessing. By placing themselves in collaboration with the Holy Spirit,  the words and actions of a witness may prompt AMENs in the lives of those around them.

Our most fervent prayer is that the Spirit be with us. We seek that our witness arouse in another the aspiration to profess the faith with renewed conviction, with confidence and hope. Amen.

Appendix: Markers to Consider in Developing a Witness Talk

  • · Will you story be meaningful to you alone or will others find it accessible?
  • · How will this presentation “fit” into what else is occurring within the any setting?
  • · What are the potential consequences of sharing information for the recipient?
  • · What are you hoping to inspire? What is your call to action? How might others respond with an AMEN in their lives?
  • · How does this message tie into our Church’s understanding of the life and message of Jesus Christ? What is the Good News that your testimony offers to the recipient?

Resources:

  • · Mae Richardson, High School Leadership Institute, Emmaus Track Information Packet, Archdiocese of Baltimore
  • · David Charboneau, Giving a Witness Talk , Seattle OYYAM
  • · Robert Rice, Franciscan University of Steubenville

· <image source>

D. Scott Miller

D. Scott Miller is the dean of Catholic Youth Ministry bloggers which is a polite way of either saying that he is just plain old or has been blogging for a long time (since 2004.)

Scott recently married the lovely Anne and together they have five adult young people and also grandparent three delightful kids (so, maybe he is just plain old!) Scott presently serves at Saint John the Evangelist in Columbia, MD as the director of youth and young adult ministry.

He has previously served on the parish, regional, diocesan, and national levels as well as having taught within a catholic high school. He is one of the founders of RebuildMyChurch and has returned to posting regularly (keeping regular is important to old guys) at ProjectYM.


D. Scott Miller


D. Scott Miller is the dean of Catholic Youth Ministry bloggers which is a polite way of either saying that he is just plain old or has been blogging for a long time (since 2004.)

Scott recently married the lovely Anne and together they have five adult young people and also grandparent three delightful kids (so, maybe he is just plain old!) Scott presently serves at Saint John the Evangelist in Columbia, MD as the director of youth and young adult ministry.

He has previously served on the parish, regional, diocesan, and national levels as well as having taught within a catholic high school. He is one of the founders of RebuildMyChurch and has returned to posting regularly (keeping regular is important to old guys) at ProjectYM.



Questions or Comments?

Join the conversation about Can I Get a Witness? over in our Facebook group. GO THERE NOW

Try Out Our New Online Membership Community for Free!

Click the button below to find out more about Thrive and claim your invite to a free trial of the new community created exclusively for Catholic youth ministers.

CLICK HERE

You have Successfully Subscribed!

Become a ProjectYM VIP



You have Successfully Subscribed!