Ministry at the Museum

As a culture, we are quickly growing past the concept that information is power. If we hoard information from others, the theory used to be, we would gain some sort of inside track into the future.In the end, however, we learn that it is impossible attempting to serve as some sort of Larry Daley character from the Night at the Museum movies attempting to contain information rather than play with it or even assemble it and lead with it.

If security guard is not a desirable role anymore, let’s consider two others.

John Roberto has been discussing the role of curator a lot recently. On the internet, a “content” curator serves as a type of editor who finds, collects, filters, and shares relevant, interesting links on the internet relating to a specific interest or group of interests. That’s what I’ve always viewed my own roles as a blogger even before I hadthe language for it. It is, furthermore, what you do as well with your social networking feeds on facebook and twitter.

Yet, there is yet another museum related function to be explored here… that of the docent. This is a title used for those who serve as guides of the collection, communicating and interpreting. Much training and mentoring/ “shadowing” is expected before one assumes the role as an official docent.

More and more, I have come to understand my own role as both curator as well as one who equips and empowers docents… parents, other adults, and youth ministers who accompany young people through faith experiences. Working with docents demands that we understand ourselves as one who is not in the middle of everything. Rather, we become aware that our reach is expanded. The Jesuits understand this as Striving for the Magis. In seeking the Magis (the more, the greater), one is working towards excellence as well as the “further still,” the deeper towards which we can go in our service to God and with others.

In the end, this is the work of evangelization and catechesis – not to hoard the Good News as something to be protected as much as to gather up the masterpieces of the Spirit’s activity and then to help others to help still even more others consider and commit throughout all the nations.

This is why I do what I do.   More importantly, allow me to quote the great Robin Williams who, in his character of reanimated Teddy Roosevelt, challenged guard Larry Daley, I’m made of wax, Larry. What are you made of?

D. Scott Miller

D. Scott Miller is the dean of Catholic Youth Ministry bloggers which is a polite way of either saying that he is just plain old or has been blogging for a long time (since 2004.)

Scott recently married the lovely Anne and together they have five adult young people and also grandparent three delightful kids (so, maybe he is just plain old!) Scott presently serves at Saint John the Evangelist in Columbia, MD as the director of youth and young adult ministry.

He has previously served on the parish, regional, diocesan, and national levels as well as having taught within a catholic high school. He is one of the founders of RebuildMyChurch and has returned to posting regularly (keeping regular is important to old guys) at ProjectYM.


D. Scott Miller


D. Scott Miller is the dean of Catholic Youth Ministry bloggers which is a polite way of either saying that he is just plain old or has been blogging for a long time (since 2004.)

Scott recently married the lovely Anne and together they have five adult young people and also grandparent three delightful kids (so, maybe he is just plain old!) Scott presently serves at Saint John the Evangelist in Columbia, MD as the director of youth and young adult ministry.

He has previously served on the parish, regional, diocesan, and national levels as well as having taught within a catholic high school. He is one of the founders of RebuildMyChurch and has returned to posting regularly (keeping regular is important to old guys) at ProjectYM.



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