So What?

So_What_jpg_scaled_1000This is Margaret’s favorite question. She is my collaborator in the office…  After all is said and done, she wants to understand the “So What?” the practical implication of it all.  Without a good “So What?”, why did we even do it anyway?

After this week’s posted introspection on an exit strategy, considering deconstruction, and how we as a culture need to stop stealing dreams along with some other events, here are my so what’s… being written live this morning and then posted up immediately…

> Not on the blog, but often in personal life, I will ironically joke that “I don’t like kids (especially my own.)”  Nothing is further than the truth, but I am probably unconsciously taking a shot at those in youth ministry who build their whole lives around kids.
I watched a popular Catholic speaker earlier this week, and the longer that the person went on with a canned presentation, the more I wonder if s/he actually liked kids… even their own.

There should be an optimism in us about the next generation.  There should be a sense of hope about our work and ministry…  and if we are asking and suggesting change, it is because of the hope that lies within us that we can and should be better in our service on behalf of the youngchurch.  And, now more than ever, that change must come in the manner we understand ourselves as part of the church, not just the youngchurch and that our ministry is not just to be youth-centric… because we like kids, the Church, and a Lord that insists that we Let the children come to me, and do not prevent them; for the kingdom of heaven belongs to such as these. (Matthew 19)

> I was reading recently in Newsweek about the challenges of twenty-somethings in developing real  relationships.  Author Robin Henig, suggests that After all, much crucial relationship building work is done in the 20s. According to research by the late Bernice Neugarten of the University of Chicago, who helped launch the academic study of human development, people choose most of their adult relationships, both friends and lovers, between the ages of 22 and 28….  Finding intimacy—the basis and byproduct of good friendships—is one of the five major life tasks of young adults ages 18 to 30, according to Robert Arnstein, a Yale psychiatrist who was, like Neugarten, a pioneer in the study of development through the life span…. But with so much of friendship in this age group now being navigated online, an essential question is what the effect of that interaction is.
If I was to take seriously what we understand from The Juvenilization of American Christianity and attempt to steer the future adult church… then it most likely would and should be center on the experience of community for our young people… and not just the temporary limited experiences of community from conference/ retreat / workcamp or from the segregate youth group.  As a Church was can not be sustained towards the future with those who claim to be spiritual but not religious.   Community / Communion / Communio must be the thing

> But the daily blog is no longer sustainable in terms of my time (at least at present- staff member short, trying to keep many balls in the air while also attempting to achieve a healthy balance in life)  sooo… filler pieces to serve a daily schedule of postings are no longer sustainable. We will keep running the newsletter so you can see what is going on in our office, but other pieces will likely be chosen as to how they truly relate to the vision of youth ministry that is hinted above.

D. Scott Miller

D. Scott Miller is the dean of Catholic Youth Ministry bloggers which is a polite way of either saying that he is just plain old or has been blogging for a long time (since 2004.)

Scott recently married the lovely Anne and together they have five adult young people and also grandparent three delightful kids (so, maybe he is just plain old!) Scott presently serves at Saint John the Evangelist in Columbia, MD as the director of youth and young adult ministry.

He has previously served on the parish, regional, diocesan, and national levels as well as having taught within a catholic high school. He is one of the founders of RebuildMyChurch and has returned to posting regularly (keeping regular is important to old guys) at ProjectYM.


D. Scott Miller


D. Scott Miller is the dean of Catholic Youth Ministry bloggers which is a polite way of either saying that he is just plain old or has been blogging for a long time (since 2004.)

Scott recently married the lovely Anne and together they have five adult young people and also grandparent three delightful kids (so, maybe he is just plain old!) Scott presently serves at Saint John the Evangelist in Columbia, MD as the director of youth and young adult ministry.

He has previously served on the parish, regional, diocesan, and national levels as well as having taught within a catholic high school. He is one of the founders of RebuildMyChurch and has returned to posting regularly (keeping regular is important to old guys) at ProjectYM.



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